covers in residue

Making Cover Crops Work in a Cooler No-Till Climate

Iowa no-tiller Roger Harrington has seen his share of challenges with covers, but has found a combination that saves soil, adds nitrogen and reduces erosion and weed pressure.


Above Photo: COMING UP. Cereal rye, turnips and rape emerge last year in soybean stubble and corn stalks from no-tiller Roger Harrington’s previous no-tilled crops. This three-way mix, which is typically aerially seeded, has performed well on Harrington’s 1,300-acre farm near Ollie, Iowa.


Like many no-tillers, Roger Harrington likes seeding cover crops to improve organic matter, fix nitrogen (N) in the soil and reduce erosion, weed pressure and compaction.

But he’s got some challenges farming…

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John dobberstein2

John Dobberstein

John Dobberstein is senior editor of No-Till Farmer magazine and the e-newsletter Dryland No-TillerHe previously covered agriculture for the Tulsa World and worked for daily newspapers in Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Joseph, Mich. He graduated with a B.A. in journalism and political science from Central Michigan University.

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