Articles Tagged with ''Soil compaction''

How to Avoid Soil Compaction When Grazing Covers

Cover crops are considered one of the most effective and economical ways to improve soil health. It is important, however, to avoid causing excessive compaction that could negatively affect following crop yield and increase runoff and erosion. Read more in this article from Lancaster Farming.
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[Video] Incorporating Cover Crops

Grower Burton Heatwole from Georgia shares his experience using tillage radishes as a cover crop, how using cover crops changed the soil on his farm, how cover crops reduced compaction in his soil, and more.
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[Podcast] Got Ruts? Got Compaction

This week’s podcast, sponsored by Yetter Equipment, features Aaron Daigh, Associate Professor of Soil Physics & Hydrology, North Dakota State University.
This week’s podcast, sponsored by Yetter Equipment, features Aaron Daigh, Associate Professor of Soil Physics & Hydrology, North Dakota State University.
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Soil Compaction Steals Yields

Soil compaction continues to be a concern as both precipitation during the spring and fall along with farm equipment size have dramatically increased the potential for compacting soils. Heavy farm machinery and tillage implements can magnify damage to soil structure reducing pore space between soil particles within the soil profile. Read more in this article from Ohio's Country Journal.
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Problems Caused by Soil Compaction

Soil compaction is a common and constant problem on most farms that till the soil. Heavy farm machinery can create persistent subsoil compaction. Scientists have found that compacted soils (a) physically restricted root growth; (b) decrease root zone aeration; and (c) reduces drainage, (d) increased losses of nitrogen from denitrification, (e) increases soil erosion. Read more in this article from Ohio's Country Journal.
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Poor Soil Health Causes Compaction, Poor Soil Structure

Engineers insist that soil compaction is caused by wheel traffic (true) but it also comes from excessive tillage, rain (think hard driving rains) and gravity (to a lesser degree). Soil compaction is poor soil structure due to a lack of roots and active carbon (soil organic matter, SOM) from root exudates. Read more in this article from Ohio's Country Journal.
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Cover Crops Solve Soil Compaction

Due to the very wet spring in 2019, farmers were forced to work their soil wetter then they prefer to be able to plant their crop. When soils are tilled when wet, soil compaction will occur. When soils are compacted they are less productive and less healthy. Compacted soils have less pore space, and that means that plant roots might not be able to 'breathe,‘ and both root development and nutrient uptake are restricted.
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Are You Feeding Your ‘Livestock’?

Earthworms — they are the unsung heroes and unpaid employees on your farm. According to Frank Gibbs, one of the featured speakers at the National Strip-Tillage Conference held earlier this month in Peoria, Ill., worms are always working to enrich your soil.
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Attend the 2022 National No-Tillage Conference

Join more than 40 top-notch no-tillers, agronomists, researchers and other no-till experts in Louisville, January 4-7, 2022, to discover innovative ideas that can help you get the most out of your no-till farming system. The 30th anniversary National No-Tillage Conference offers a mix of thought-provoking General Sessions, expert-led No-Till Classrooms and collaborative No-Till Roundtables. Plus, valuable pesticide recertification and Certified Crop Advisor credits are available to qualifying attendees.

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