EXCLUSIVE ALL-ACCESS ATTENDEE BONUS SESSIONS

 

National Cover Crop Summit

Purchase a $49 All-Access Pass to receive access to each of the 12 Spring 2022 National Cover Crop Summit sessions starting on March 15, 2022. Your All-Access Pass also gives you 40+ bonus sessions featured below from past National Cover Crop Summits. View these inspiring sessions at your own convenience for an extended 12-month period with your All-Access Pass. It's like the Netflix for Cover Croppers!

 

2021 National Cover Crop Summit Session Replays

 

Establishing Cover Crops & Achieving Adequate Biomass

Mark Licht
Assistant Professor/Extension Cropping Systems Specialist,
Iowa State University

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Mark Licht

Licht will discuss cover crop establishment and what that means for fall and spring cover crop biomass. Find out which cover crop species can help your operation establish excellent cover crop stands and grow substantial quantities of biomass.

 

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Improving the Soil Down in the Deep South with Cover Crops

Marty Earnest
Grower, Caldwell Parish, La.

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Marty Earnest

Louisiana grower Marty Earnest will share how he's been able to invigorate soil on his corn/soybean operation through a combination of no-till and cover crops, increasing soil organic matter, decreasing soil erosion and improving microbial life in the soil. He's also been able to reduce his input costs to better weather volatile cash crop markets.

 

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Lessons in Continuous Cover Cropping

Mike Brocksmith
Grower,
Vincennes, Ind.

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Mike Brocksmith

Mike Brocksmith, Vincennes, Ind., has used conservation tillage for more than 30 years. He will share the changes he's seen on his farm since beginning to use covers in 2009, including changes to the soil and nutrient levels. Brocksmith will also discuss how he's implemented continuous cover crops on his operation.

 

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Managing Cover Crop Pests

Scott Graham
Entomologist, Auburn University.

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Scott Graham

Graham will discuss which pests are particularly problematic both above and below the soil for various cash crops, including corn, soybeans, cotton and wheat; which cover crop species can help mitigate problems with different types of pests; and the impact of cover crops on nematodes.

 

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Planting Fall Cover Crops While Managing Late Emerging Weeds

Gregg Johnson
Associate Professor,
University of Minnesota

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Gregg Johnson

Johnson will discuss how cover crops can be used as a management tool and how covers can help growers combat late-emerging weeds such as waterhemp.

 

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Profitably Grazing Cattle on Cover Crops

CJ Blew & Olivia Amundson

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CJ Blew
Olivia Amundson

Kansas cattleman CJ Blew will share how his 24,000-acre cow-calf operation has incorporated grazing cover crops into their fifth-generation cattle ranch, located near Castleton, Kan. Blew will discuss how the operation selects cover crop species for grazing and how cattle performance and health has improved since making the switch from 3,000 acres of irrigated cropland and dryland to grazing cover crops.
Olivia Amundson will discuss how grazing cover crops can decrease variable feed costs, which cover crop species can provide the most nutrition for cattle, and other benefits of grazing covers on cattle health and performance. Olson also shares how he uses full-season annual cover crop cocktails to break the rootworm cycle in his corn crop, why he transitioned away from seeding cover crops in the fall and how his operation utilizes cover crops as forage for the dairy cattle herd. Olson has eliminated alfalfa and implemented a crop rotation including triticale, sorghum-sudangrass, Italian ryegrass and clover that is harvested three times.

 

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Growers Share Their Experiences with Cover Crops & Soil Health

Jim Denys, Dean Jackson & Lucinda Stuenkel

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Jim Denys
Dean Jackson
Lucinda Stuenkel

In this panel discussion, hear from growers who have had success in improving their soil health, thanks to cover crops. You'll hear from Jim Denys, Parkhill, Ontario, Dean Jackson, Columbia Crossroads, Penn., and Lucinda Stuenkel, Palmer, Kans.

 

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Preventing Herbicide Residual
Effects on Cover Crops

Gared Shaffer
Weed Field Specialist,
South Dakota State University

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Bob-Clements

Shaffer discusses preventing uneven cover crop establishment, areas of the field where herbicide carryover is most likely to occur and what factors result in higher herbicide effects on cover crops.
He'll also discuss how to utilize cover crops to make weeds less competitive, which weed species to watch out for, and how temperature and moisture fluctuations can impact cover crops emergence and weed pressure.

 

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Breaking Pest Cycles with Full
Season Cover Crops

Daniel Olson
Grower, Lena, Wis.

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Bob-Clements

Daniel Olson details how he chooses cover crop mixes for his 1,200-acre dairy, where he milks 400 cows with his family. In addition to farming, Olson provides forage consulting services to dairy farmers.
Olson also shares how he uses full-season annual cover crop cocktails to break the rootworm cycle in his corn crop, why he transitioned away from seeding cover crops in the fall and how his operation utilizes cover crops as forage for the dairy cattle herd. Olson has eliminated alfalfa and implemented a crop rotation including triticale, sorghum-sudangrass, Italian ryegrass and clover that is harvested three times.

 

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Maximizing the Potential Soil Health
Benefits of Cover Crops

Kip Balkcom
Research Agronomist,
USDA ARS

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Bob-Clements

Cover crops are currently one of the most popular agricultural research topics being examined across the U.S. High residue cover crops combined with conservation tillage can reverse unfavorable soil conditions, such as soil compaction, which ultimately improves productivity of irrigated and rainfed cropping systems.
However, correctly managing cover crops is critical for single species and cover crop mixtures to maximize potential soil health benefits. This presentation will help attendees understand how management factors can affect cover crop performance.
Kip Balkcom will explore how plant and termination dates affect biomass production, tillage and planting equipment modifications facilitate operation in high residue, economic considerations, and how cover crop benefits, such as water conservation, are enhanced with cover crops and/or when combined with conservation tillage.

 

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Optimizing Cover Crops with
Solar Corridors

Joel Gruver
Associate Professor of Soil Science & Sustainable Ag,
Western Illinois University

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Bob-Clements

Joel Gruver shares how solar corridor planting systems create new opportunities for successfully intercropping cover crops with corn on conventional and organic farms.
He'll also explore how strategic adjustment of crop spacing, both in-row and between rows, and complementary practices like banding of nitrogen can greatly increase cover crop productivity while minimizing loss of crop productivity.
Closer in-row spacing of corn plants increases their competitive advantage over weeds and wider inter-row spacing enhances light penetration allowing significant growth of intercropped legumes and N fixation during the corn production season.
Gruver will summarize lessons learned from 3 years of investigation on his research farm and other farms experimenting with the practice.

 

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Preserving Water & Soil Quality
Using Cover Crops

Robb Ewoldt
Grower, Davenport, Iowa

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Bob-Clements

Rob Ewoldt discusses how cover crops reduce his use of crop protection products and to improve water quality on his 1,100 acre farm, which is located near Davenport, Iowa, including the installation of the first bioreactor (underground water infiltration system) in eastern Iowa.
Ewoldt combines no-till, strip-till and cover crops to control erosion on their operation, which includes beef cattle, horses and a 2,400-head wean-finish barn where they feed pigs for Eichelberger Farms.
Ewoldt also shares tips on maximizing planter technology when planting cover crops into cash crops from his 10-plus years of cover crop use.

 

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The Economics of Utilizing Cover Crops
in a Dryland Environment

Jimmy Emmons
Grower, Leedey, Okla.

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Bob-Clements

Third-generation grower Jimmy Emmons discusses how cover crops are an integral part of his rotational grazing program for his cow/calf operation while leveraging covers to help retain moisture in the dry climate of Oklahoma.
Emmons shares how cover crops have paid off economically for his 2,000-acre operation, which includes a rotation of wheat, canola, rye, sunflowers, peas, soybeans, milo, sesame and alfalfa.
Emmons has built his operation into a soil health system, with many parts contributing to the rehabilitation of his land, including no-till, which he has utilized for more than 20 years.

 

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Maximize Livestock Feed Resources with
Cover Crops: Tips From a Cover Crop Addict

Bill Buessing
Grower, Axtell, Kan.

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Bob-Clements

No-tiller and self-described “cover crop addict,” Bill Buessing, Axtell, Kan., details how he adds various cover crop species to crop rotations as forages for his cattle and sheep to graze while building soil health and fixing valuable nutrients in the soil, which has allowed him to cut back on fertilizer.
He maintains a cash crop or cover-crop mix on every acre of his farm year-round and will share results from his experimental plots, where he tests more than 40 different types of covers and blends.
Cover crops have allowed Buessing to reduce nutrient runoff, retain and utilize more water, slow down wind erosion, help with weed control, build organic matter in the soil, recycle nutrients and building nitrogen for present and future crops.

 

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Three Steps to a Growing Revolution:
Where Do Cover Crops Fit?

Dave Montgomery
Professor, Earth & Space Sciences,
University of Washington

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Bob-Clements

Author of five books and Professor of Earth & Space Sciences at the University of Washington, Dave Montgomery discusses how cover crops can be part of the soil health solution while helping reduce soil degradation.
Montgomery shares his observations on cover cropping around the globe while researching for his book, "Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life." He says cover crops can be part of a 3-prong approach to restoring soil health, including reducing tillage and crop rotation.
Find out why Montgomery says growers should park the plow to minimize soil disturbance, grow cover crops, including legumes, to get nitrogen and carbon into the soil, and grow a diversity of crops.

 

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A Balancing Act: Carbon to Nitrogen
Ratios with Cover Crops

Trey Hill
Grower, Rock Hall, Maryland

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Bob-Clements

Maryland grower Trey Hill explains how he uses cover crops to balance organic matter production and nutrient availability and the tools he uses to diagnose and correct nitrogen management on his 10,000 acre farm that is 100% cover cropped.
Hill will also share how he leverages this data to determine termination timing of his cover crops. By building optimal soil health by aerial seeding cereal rye, radish and clover, Hill has achieved cost savings and maximized return on investment. Understanding how much nitrogen the cover crops are sequestering in the soil profile, Hill determines whether or not it’s best to plant into his cover crops green.

 

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Using Cover Crops to Build Your
Most Valuable Asset

Ray McCormick
Grower, Vincennes, Ind.

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Bob-Clements

Fourth generation Indiana no-tiller Ray McCormick shares how he sets up and seeds his cover crops on the 2,000-acre farm where he raises corn, soybeans, wheat and beef cattle with his son, Nate.
McCormick also details how he manages residue for maximum cover crop emergence, how he tackles challenges with terminating cover crops in the spring and how he has built up the water holding capacity of his soil. Seeding cover crops on his 100% no-till farm since 2008, McCormick understands why building organic matter and enabling your soil to sequester carbon is building your most valuable asset.

 

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Cover Crops & Cows: A Common
Sense Approach

Daryl Obermeyer
Grower, Brownville, Neb.

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Bob-Clements

Nebraska grower Daryl Obermeyer discusses how he leverages cover crops to save time, fuel, fertilizer and water on his dryland farm near Brownville, Neb. Obermeyer has aerial-seeded cover crops to help curb erosion in the loamy soil on his farm and switched to no-tilling in 1986.
With nearly 35 years of experience using cover crops, Obermeyer will share how the economics of grazing cover crops by his herd of Simmental cattle. Obermeyer also uses covers to help with weed control and has seen significant changes in how resilient his soil is from growing rye, turnips, radish and oats.

 

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Part 1: Successful Integration of Multispecies
Cover Crops & Livestock

John Macauley
Grower, Groveland, N.Y.

Part 2: High Residue Cover Crop Management
Using the Roller Crimper

Erin Silva
Associate Professor,
University of Wisconsin-Madison

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Bob-Clements

New York cattleman John Macauley shares how he's saved fuel and labor costs by parking the plow and implementing cover crops on his 1,200-acre operation in a corn, soybean, wheat and hay crop rotation. Macauley also discusses how cover crops have helped fix nitrogen in his soil and his successes with roller crimping cover crops as a termination method. Macauley will share how he transitioned away from full tillage around 2005 and the yield differences between conventional tillage, strip-till and no-till. Macauley will explore how adding cover crops to no-tilling enabled him reduce fertilizer rates and maximize herbicide applications.

 

Dr. Erin Silva is an associate professor in the Plant Pathology Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research and extension program focuses on sustainable and organic cropping systems, including cover crops and cover crop-based no-till production, variety selection in organic environments and the impact of organic management on soil biological and physical properties. Silva has launched a comprehensive organic grain training program for farmers in the upper Midwest, “OGRAIN.” She works closely with organic farmers and industry members both in Wisconsin and throughout the upper Midwest and serves on the Wisconsin Organic Advisory Council.

 

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2020 National Cover Crop Summit Session Replays

 

It's Not Too Late for Frost Seeding

Sjoerd Duiker
Professor of Soil Management,
Penn State Univ.

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Bob-Clements

Although many growers may consider the “ideal” time to plant cover crops is immediately after harvest, having snow on the ground is not a reason to give up on utilizing the benefits cover crops can offer. This is where frost seeding comes into play as a cover crop seeding method.
Cover crop seeds are small and hardy, allowing Mother Nature to help establish seed to soil contact through the soil’s up and down movement as it freezes and thaws. There is no need for tillage when frost seeding is used.
Sjoerd Duiker, a professor of soil management and soil physics, will discuss the best cover crop species to use for frost seeding at the 2020 National Cover Crop Summit: Fall Edition. His presentation will also cover the preferred timing for frost seeding and how to effectively plant cover crop seeds when frost seeding for optimum results.

 

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Improving Soil Health Through Diverse
Crop Rotations Including Covers

Dan Forgey
Grower, Gettysburg, S.D.

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Bob-Clements

Daniel Olson details how he chooses cover crop mixes for his 1,200-acre dairy, where he milks 400 cows with his family. In addition to farming, Olson provides forage consulting services to dairy farmers.
Olson also shares how he uses full-season annual cover crop cocktails to break the rootworm cycle in his corn crop, why he transitioned away from seeding cover crops in the fall and how his operation utilizes cover crops as forage for the dairy cattle herd. Olson has eliminated alfalfa and implemented a crop rotation including triticale, sorghum-sudangrass, Italian ryegrass and clover that is harvested three times.

 

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Aerial Seeding Can Be An Effective
Cover Crop Seeding Method

Adam Kramer
Grower, Prairie du Chien, Wis.

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Bob-Clements

Harvest season is a busy time. There is so much for a grower to organize, manage and stay on top of that adding one more thing during the season — like seeding cover crops — just seems way too daunting. However, there are other seeding options for growers to consider that don’t require any additional physical labor on the grower’s part. Aerial seeding is one of those options.
Aerial seeding is an ideal choice for getting cover crops seeded when time is of the essence, or when ground conditions are less than ideal for equipment, such as when soil is wet. Aerial seeding still provides the same flexibility for planting cover crop mixes, as the method can be used for multiple cover crop species.
Adam Kramer, grower and Certified Crop Advisor from Prairie du Chien, Wis., will discuss how aerial application can be an economical choice. Kramer’s presentation will share his experiences working with growers who are aerial seeding and what growers should know to help make aerial seeding successful in their operations.

 

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Spice Up Corn & Soybeans
with Cover Crops

Nick Gutterman
Grower, Miami County, Kan.

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Bob-Clements

Corn and soybeans are the two most common crops grown in the U.S. Many growers who raise those crops might not know how to break the corn-and-soy cycle to include cover crops. One grower from Kansas shares tips on how it can be done.
Nick Guetterman farms with his father and 3 brothers in Miami County, Kan. Their 16,000-acre operation uses cover crops to increase their soil organic matter while growing corn and soybeans.
Guetterman will discuss how the operation has added cover crops such as winter peas, canola and rye to their corn and soybean rotation. Guetterman will also share how higher soil organic matter levels have resulted in higher yields, how double-cropping has helped with residue levels and improving soil health, and how the farm determines how much cover crops to seed between corn and soybean crops.

 

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Cover Crops Work for Dairies, Too

David Trimner
Miltrim Farms, Athens, Wis.

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Bob-Clements

Dairy operations typically have one primary goal: make as much milk as possible, since that is the product they are paid for. Miltrim Farms, a dairy based in Athens, Wis., seeks to not just produce large quantities of milk, but also to be good environmental stewards of the land and water.
David Trimner, a 4th generation dairyman and General Manager of Miltrim Farms, will share how the largest automated dairy in Wisconsin has incorporated cover crops to enhance water quality. Miltrim Farms, established in 1988, milks 2,500 cows, grows crops on 4,800 acres and has 40 full-time employees. Trimner will discuss how Miltrim Farms uses covers to reduce erosion and water runoff, why the dairy uses minimal tillage practices, and how they interseed alfalfa into corn.

 

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Integrating Livestock with a
Cover Crop System

John Stigge
Grower and Lifestock Producer,
Washington, Kan.

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Bob-Clements

Adding livestock to a cover crop system is considered the last step in bringing cover crops full circle in an operation. One Kansas grower and livestock producer shares insights from 35-plus years of no-till, 23 years of cover cropping and using livestock to increase his soil’s health and productivity while significantly reducing input costs.
John Stigge, Washington, Kan., has a philosophy focused on soil health and raises carbon-negative beef on his 1,200 acre farm. Stigge and his family have mastered carbon sequestration, which results in accelerated growth of grasses and cover crops and increased soil organic matter.

 

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Using Cover Crops, Better Soil Biology to
Boost Fertilizer, Irrigation Efficiency

Nick Vos
Grower, Hugoton, Kan.

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Bob-Clements

Soil biology and traditional fertilizer and irrigation practices may not seem to have a relationship — but to Nick Vos, it’s a no brainer.
The South African-born grower, who raises corn, soybeans, wheat and sorghum near Hugoton, Kan., will outline how improvements in soil biology through cover crop seeding and reduced soil disturbance can help farmers implement root exudation 365 days a year while reducing commercial inputs, preserving soil moisture and improving irrigation-use efficiency, even in one of the driest farming regions in the U.S.

 

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Increasing Organic Matter Through
Covers, Crop Rotation in a Dryland Environment

Kelly Kettner
No-Tiller, Muleshoe, Texas

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Bob-Clements

Kelly Kettner, Muleshoe, Texas, will be sharing his experiences using cover crops to increase organic matter on his 5,000 acre operation.
Kettner has been no-tilling since 2005 and plans his crop rotations carefully, including corn, cotton, barley, rye, wheat, soybeans, pumpkins and sorghum, in addition to cover crops. Crop rotation allows Kettner to use different herbicide options to control residual weeds, such as pigweed. In the dry Texas Panhandle, storing soil moisture is critical, and since switching to no-till and building up organic matter, corn yields are 260-270 bushels per acre.

 

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Breathing New Life Into Your Semi-Arid
Soils with Cover Crops

Jake Mowrer
Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist
in Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University

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Bob-Clements

Jake Mowrer, a soil nutrient and water resource management specialist at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, will explain different soil fertility practices to make cover crop production even more efficient, and why growers should think of their soil as massive habitat—and how to keep it thriving.
Although farmers tend to focus on the plant growing above the ground, Mowrer will discuss the work that plant roots do to wrest nutrients from the soil. Mowrer will share lessons on what growers can do to prevent soil degradation. Through his explanations, he will describe the nature of soil make up and share tips on how to improve soil quality.

 

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Making the Transition: Gradually Building
a Cover Crop Program for Your Operation

Zeb Winslow
No-Tiller, Scotland Neck, N.C.

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Bob-Clements

Zeb Winslow, Scotland Neck, N.C., will be discussing how he transitioned his family operation to using no-till and cover crops while keeping the ledger in the black during the mid-1990s.
The fifth-generation farmer uses a diverse mix of cover crops, including rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, rapeseed, wooly pod vetch and winter peas while growing cash crops of corn, soybeans and cotton on 800 acres. Cover crops are rolled before planting to help with weed suppression and moisture conservation, and cash crops are planted green into the covers. Winslow will discuss how he got started using cover crops and slowly built up to where they are today.

 

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Adopting a ‘2020 Mindset’ with Perennial
Covers, Organic No-Till in Mind

Loran Steinlage
No-Tiller, West Union, Iowa

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Bob-Clements

The farming system Loran Steinlage built has been under constant evolution the last several years, from no-tilling to interseeding cover crops to companion and relay cropping cash crops and cover crops.
The owner of FLOLO farms in West Union, Iowa, who raises corn, soybeans, cereal rye, winter wheat, malt barley and buckwheat, will talk about the next step — integrating organic practices and perennial cover crops — to keep living plants in the ground 24/7/365. He’ll share some of the data he’s collecting to verify the system is working, and also how he’s managed to suppress cover crops with his innovative farming methods instead of terminating them.

 

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Weed and Pest Management Considerations
with Cover Crops

Erin Haramoto
Weed Scientist, University of Kentucky

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Bob-Clements

Erin Haramoto, University of Kentucky weed scientist, will talk about her research on how weeds and weed seeds in the soil respond to practices like cover crop planting and reduced tillage.
She will also discuss management decisions growers should consider when utilizing cover crops specifically for weed suppression, especially for tough weeds like marestail, that have a better chance for increasing economic returns. Haramoto’s presentation will also address how covers can be used to control nematodes, the impacts on insects and forage quality.

 

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Do Cover Crops Really Pay Off?
Crunching the Numbers

Jim Hoorman
Former NRCS and Extension Educator,
Ohio State University

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Bob-Clements

Cover crops should be viewed as an investment line item, rather than an expense in the farm budget. Jim Hoorman, former NRCS and Extension educator with Ohio State University Extension and owner of Hoorman Soil Health Services, explains how and when cover crops will start to pay off for growers and how they can pay when used as forage or for grazing livestock.
Hoorman will also discuss how the many benefits of cover crops, such as improved soil quality and reduced nutrient loss will result in increased yields and higher profitability.

 

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Leveraging Cover Crops as a Feed Source

Nick Jorgensen
No-Tiller, Ideal, S.D.

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Bob-Clements

Nick Jorgensen, Ideal, S.D., uses native grass cover crops as part of the feeding program for Jorgensen Land & Cattle’s cow/calf and bull development operation. The fourth-generation farm and ranch has farmed 12,000 non-irrigated, no-till acres since the early 1990s, placing a strong emphasis on soil health and sustainability throughout their production system.
Jorgensen will discuss how cover crops can be part of the livestock diet for high-performing, healthy cattle that are ready to express their genetic potential. Jorgensen Land & Cattle uses a diverse crop rotation with as many as 12 different crops and graze their bull herd on cover crops grown during the off growing season, which has helped them lower production costs while improving soil health.

 

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2019 National Cover Crop Summit Replays

 

Improving Farm and Feedlot Soil Health
with Cover Crops

Shawn Tiffany
Rancher, Tiffany Cattle Co.,
Herington, Kan.

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Bob-Clements

Shawn Tiffany will outline how he and his brother, Shane, have evolved their custom cattle-finishing facility — which services more than 32,000 head at two sites — from strictly grazing native Flint Hills pastures to grazing and forage, and finally, adding cover crops for soil improvement.
Tiffany will share important figures on livestock gain and performance documented through cover crop grazing, as well as yield benefits to his rotation of corn, winter wheat, silage sorghum and soybean.

 

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Integrating Timely Interseeding of Cover
Crops for Soil Health and Grazing Benefits

Tom Cotter
Grower, Austin, Minn.

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Bob-Clements

For many no-tillers in the northern U.S. it’s easy to stick with the same corn/soybean rotation or just seed cereal rye and call it good — but Tom Cotter decided several years ago that’s not good enough.
The Austin, Minn., no-tiller will share how he’s interseeding covers into corn and beans and seeding multi-species mixes after harvest for winter grazing as he backgrounds calves and produces all-natural beef products for the retail market

 

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Examining Cover Crop Benefits in Continuous Wheat and
Cotton Rotations in a Semi-Arid Environment

Paul DeLaune
Soil Scientist, Texas A&M University
Department of Soil and Crop Sciences

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Bob-Clements

Many growers in drier environments on the Great Plains could benefit from cover crops but worry that adding covers to their rotation will take too much moisture away from their cash crops and potentially hurt yields.
Soil scientist Paul DeLaune will share the results of two multi-year studies Texas A&M University carried out on the effects of cover crops not only on yields in continuous cotton and wheat systems but also important metrics such as water infiltration and retention, and changes in soil properties and soil microbial activity.

 

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A 360-Degree Perspective on How Cover Crops
Affect Farm Profitability

Rob Myers
Regional Director of Extension Programs,
North-Central Region USDA Sustainable Agriculture
Research and Education (SARE) Program

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Bob-Clements

One of the biggest questions growers have about cover crops is how the benefits will pay off for their operation, and the answers often consist of partial budget analyses of seed costs and yield effects by universities that don’t go far enough, says Rob Myers.
The regional director of extension programs for the USDA’s Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program will share results of a new national cover crop economics assessment that will look at how cover crop seeding benefits the entire farm operation — from longer-term effects on crop yields over several years to their impact on fighting herbicide-resistant weeds and soil compaction, to revenue diversification via grazing programs

 

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Rolling Cover Crops Successfully in
No-Till Systems

Erin Silva
University of Wisconsin Extension
Specialist, Organic Agriculture

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Bob-Clements

One growing method of cover management in no-till systems is terminating overwintering cover crops using a roller/crimper before, during or shortly after planting. This can be an especially valuable tool for organic operations that must avoid using herbicides for this task, or for growers wanting another tool to fight weeds.
Erin Silva will describe the successful organic no-till production techniques that include rolling and crimping cereal rye at soybean planting, which keeps a living root in the soil longer and leaves a mat of plant residue on the soil surface to suppress weeds and build biomass and soil organic matter. She’ll also share tips for setting up and operating a roller-crimper system successfully in a conventional or organic no-till operation.

 

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Succeeding with Aerially Seeded Cover Crops — Even in Spring!

Damon Reabe
Cover Crop Applicator and 
Co-Owner of Dairyland Aviation

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Bob-Clements

Many no-tillers complain aerially seeded cover crops result in poor stands. But Damon Reabe has spent the last 7 years studying stand failures and says there are some strategies no-tillers can employ to dramatically increase the chances of getting better stands.
The aerial cover crop applicator and co-owner of Dairyland Aviation from Waupun, Wis., will explain the necessary steps to ensure a successful cover crop stand, including what seed species work best when broadcast, the best timing of application, how sunlight can affect success rates and what soils have the greatest success rate. He’ll also touch on some successful work he’s done seeding cereal rye in March into corn and soybean residue to offer an alternative timeline to get a cover crop established before planting.

 

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Realizing the Potential of Alternative Row
Spacings and Biomass-Building Cover Crops

Chris Teachout
Grower, Shenandoah, Iowa

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Bob-Clements

Chris Teachout will outline his progression of cover crop seeding approaches on his 1,850-acre farm in southwestern Iowa — from broadcasting the seed early on to offset planting covers into corn at V3-V4. Then he’ll share yield and biomass data from his on-farm trials last year planting corn at higher populations in 60-inch rows vs. 30-inch rows and seeding cover crops in between the wider rows.
The fifth-generation farmer will also have data to share from planting early soybeans into cereal rye on his farm.

 

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Plan Ahead: Will My Herbicide Program
Prevent Successful Cover Crop Establishment?

John Wallace
Weed Scientist, Penn State University

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Bob-Clements

Growers that plan to integrate cover crops into their rotation will need to determine if their herbicide programs have the potential to reduce cover crop establishment success. The potential for herbicide carryover injury depends on the properties of various herbicides, weather and soil conditions, and the timing of cover crop seeding, says John Wallace.
The weed scientist from Penn State University will discuss guidelines and principles on the conditions that increase the potential for herbicide carryover, highlight herbicide label considerations, and provide information on herbicide programs that enable fall-seeding cover crops and interseeding cover crops into standing corn, drawing on data from lead Extension weed scientists in various regions.

 

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Turning ‘Educational Experiences’ into Successes
with Cover Crops in Long-Term No-Till

Adam Dahmer
Grower, Marion, Ill.

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Bob-Clements

Adam Dahmer doesn’t like to call setbacks he’s experienced with cover crops in the past as “failures” but as learning opportunities providing knowledge to move forward. Having the privilege of being raised on a farm that was 100% no-till before he was born, soil health has been the center of attention for Adam, as he’s worked with cover crops for 20 years.
Adam credits cover crops such as cereal rye for improving soil organic matter content and nitrogen retention on his farm, as well as weed and disease suppression, improved water infiltration and reduced crop stress during dry periods.
The Marion, Ill., grower will detail his current approach to cover crop management on his 1,300-acre farm and how it’s evolved over 20 years, and goals he’s set for the future with covers as he works to improve the profitability and sustainability of his no-till system. With the benefit of a longer-term perspective, Dahmer will also share some tips and advice for cover crop newcomers on how to get off to a successful start and get past early stumbling blocks.

 

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5 Mindsets that Successful Cover Croppers Have in Common

Steve Groff
Cover Crop Consultant, Holtwood, Pa.

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Bob-Clements

Making that final decision to adopt cover crops on a farm isn’t an easy one, but it’s a little easier for growers if they start with the right mindset at the beginning.
Pennsylvania no-tiller and internationally renowned cover crop coach Steve Groff will share why it’s important to see where the future of agriculture is moving and how a willingness to strategically try something new is essential to succeeding with covers.

 

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Innovative Methods and Tips for Getting
Cover Crops Planted in a Timely Manner

Steve Groff
Cover Crop Consultant, Holtwood, Pa.

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Bob-Clements

With planting delayed in many states this year, getting cover crops seeded this fall could be a challenge for many growers — with weather around harvest being another factor to consider. Some growers might even need to consider spring seeding or interseeding in 2020 to keep their cover crop program in force and protect soil health.
There are many methods for planting cover crops, but which one works best in a particular situation? Steve Groff will share some savvy approaches to planting cover crops at different times of the year, and important tips to remember when evaluating planting methods for different cover crop scenarios.

 

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QUESTIONS ABOUT THE NATIONAL COVER CROP SUMMIT?

For general conference inquiries contact Cover Crop Strategies
by phone at (866) 839-8455 or (262) 432-0388;
by fax at (262) 786-5564;
or by email at 
info@covercropstrategies.com

To learn about sponsorship opportunities contact Michael Ellis
at (262) 777-2432 or
mellis@lessitermedia.com
 

 
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